Stunt Kite Manualstunt-kite-parts

Welcome to the exciting sport of stunt kite flying. You are going to discover a whole new world that up to now you have probably not been aware even existed. One thing for sure is that from the moment of your first flight, you are in great danger of becoming a stunt kite addict.You need to be fully aware of the consequences, as we take no responsibility for the effects this may have on family and friends.

Assembly

  • With your back to the wind, unpack the kite and lay it out and familiarise yourself with the various components.
  • Insert the bottom spreader into the spine T Piece making sure the bridle lines are free.
  • Next secure the spreader into the leading edge connector. Again make sure no lines are tangled.
  • Connect the stand-offs or sail tentioners.
  • Insert top spreader.
  • Now hold the kite into the wind and make sure everything looks symmetrical and none of the bridle lines are tangled.

Connecting the flying lines to a stunt kite

Follow the sequence below to form a "larks head hitch" or "kiters knot":

stunt-kite-connecting-lines-01 stunt-kite-connecting-lines-02 stunt-kite-connecting-lines-03 stunt-kite-connecting-lines-04 stunt-kite-connecting-lines-05 stunt-kite-connecting-lines-06

 

Safety first: apply common sense and never fly near:

  • Power lines
  • Roads
  • Airfields
  • Railway lines
  • People and animals
  • Thunderstorms

Please keep in mind

  • Remember that the flying lines are most likely to be the cause of injury as they can cut and burn.
  • Never under any circumstances hold onto the line when they are under tension, and do not wind up lines while they are still attached to the kite.
  • Do not exceed the recommended maximum wind speed for your kite.
  • Stay clear of other kite fliers in your vacinity, being especially careful not to make contact with their flying lines. The safety of both you, the flyer, and the spectator are in your hands.
  • If you disregard these rules you place yourself and others in danger of serious injury.

Now for your first flight!

Requirements:

  • wind-windowAn area of at least 50m x 100m (55yds x 110yds) wide, which is reasonably smooth and soft enough to absorb some impact. (Not a car park!)
  • Wind of course is an essential requirement. The ideal wind would be steady and in the moderate range. If the wind is not ideal and you experience problems, do not persist for too long - difficult though it may be, rather wait for the right conditions. Try to stay clear of trees and buildings. The turbulence from a tree/building is 20x the height of the obstacle i.e. a tree 5m (16ft) high means you will have to stand at least 100m (110yds) away from the tree to get "clean" wind.
  • A helper of good disposition as you may require someone to blame if all does not go as planned!
  • A hat and sunglasses are useful if the wind is blowing towards the sun.
  • The wind window is that space in which your kite will remain airborne, the window is a half hemisphere in front and above the flier, with a radius equal to the length of your flying line. With your back to the wind, the area directly down wind from you and just above the ground is where you will get the strongest pull, this is known as the power zone. This is also the best place to launch your kite especially in light wind.

Setting up the kite for flying

  • Lay the kite on its back and unwind flying lines in the direction of the wind giving yourself clearance on both sides of the flying area.
  • Make sure the lines are not twisted, are of equal length, if one line is shorter than the other then the kite will always turn to that side, also ensure that the left line goes to the left of the stunter etc.
  • Pre-Launch check: have a quick look around you and make sure there are no obstacles or people in the kites flight path and do you have enough space behind you in case you need to back up quickly and be especially aware of any other kites in the sky.
  • If you have a helper ask him to hold the kite in front of himself facing you and into the wind. Now take up the slack keeping kite lines equally tensioned so that the kite launches straight up and the wind at your back.
  • Take up the slack keeping kite lines equally tensioned so that the kite launches straight up and the wind at your back.         
  • If the wind is a little on the light side wait for a gust of wind before signaling your aid to throw your stunter firmly and smoothly into the air whilst you take a step backwards at the same time.
  • The kite will accelerate swiftly upwards without much contribution from the flier.
  • If you are on your own you might try the alternative of placing the flying straps/handles over a spike (large screwdriver) and inserting it into the ground. Then place the kite directly down wind of the spike with the lines pulled taut.Stand the kite on its spine and wing tips leaning back to at least 30 degrees to prevent the kite from launching by itself. It will now be possible to self-launch by lifting the straps off the spike and maintaining even tension on the lines stepping back smartly to launch the kite.         
  • Stand the kite on its spine and wing tips leaning back to at least 30 degrees (to prevent the kite from launching by itself) It will now be possible to self-launch by lifting the straps off the spike and maintaining even tension on the lines stepping back smartly to launch the kite.
  • For beach launching lay your kite on its back with the nose facing away from you. Place a handful of sand on the sail between the stand-offs. Pick up the handles/straps and slowly take up the slack in the line. Now step backwards easing the kite into a standing position, which has the effect of removing the sand. Step back smartly, maintaining even tension on the lines, and your kite will launch.

 

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